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Jörn Reppenhagen

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  1. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Patrick Connor in A few infrareds   
    Three more. Same rig.
     



  2. Haha
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Dingdong in Astrophotography - ideas, suggestions, hints collection   
    Haha, IanSG !
    To start with astrophotography, you need to stash away about 3000 to 4000 Euros clandestinely from the control of your spouse or bank.
    Advertizing tells you slightly different things. "300 Euros for this brilliant telescope including sturdy mount of the professional grade - and you're all set."
    Accompanied with various photos taken by the Hubble telescope, of course.
    You're indeed set. For a heart attack after having a look at your first pictures.

    Typical novice dialogue in expert forums:
    Me: I've got [SUPERPRO-EXPERT-ALL-IN-ONE-PACKAGE] for 300 Euros. Can't get into focus.
    They: [facepalm] Throw away that sh... Buy a real telescope. Everybody knows that. Except you.
    300 Euros plus.

    Me: Got the real scope. Can't see much in the pictures.
    Theys: [facepalm] Buy a larger scope. Everybody knows that. Except you.
    500 Euros plus.
    Me: Got the larger scope. Mount does not hold it, always tips over. Makes funny crunching and grinding sounds. I guess that's normal?
    They: [facepalm] Forget that sh... mount. Buy a real one. Everybody knows that. Except you.
    1500 Euros plus. Should have tried the Scotch mount.
    Me: Got that real mount, bank is after me. Can expose up to 30 seconds. After that, stars become lines.
    They: [facepalm] Two options: Buy a pro mount for just 15.000 Euros. Or buy an autoguider. Everybody knows that. Except you.
    800 Euros plus for the autoguider, 150 Euros plus for the smaller scope the autoguider needs.
    Me: Got the autoguider. Can expose for centuries. But stars outside the picture's center get blurred, look like comets.
    They: [facepalm] You need a coma corrector, stupid! Everybody knows that. Except you.
    200 Euros plus.
    And so on ...
    It's an endless story. But at least you've got something to do and to burst out in tears about after having a shy look at your bank statement.
    But it still is a real fascinating hobby. Nothing compares to freezing four hours in the backyard protecting the blinking and whirring, that way shouting "steal me!" equipment from theft. Shotguns get pretty cold in winter.
    I'll have a look into the LAB thing.
    And will try my first milky way pictures as soon as the eternal German rain (you can tell the seasons by the rain's temperature, only) starts to fade.
    Thank you.
  3. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from dutchshader in A few infrareds   
    Some willows in Haldern, Germany, taken a month ago.
    Fujifilm X-T20 + Fujinon XF 18 – 55 mm , cheap (7,50 €) Neewer IR filter, 720 nm

  4. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Wosven in A few infrareds   
    Three more. Same rig.
     



  5. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Wosven in A few infrareds   
    Yes, this is infrared. I'll attach a small version of the original photo right out of camera.
    I found it highly interesting as I realized all that intense colors were still in the photo.
    Fujifilm X-T20 + Fujinon XF 18 – 55 mm , cheap (7,50 €) Neewer IR filter, 720 nm
     


  6. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Wosven in A few infrareds   
    The "Battenbergturm", one and only landmark of Haldern, Germany, taken about a month ago.
    Fujifilm X-T20 + Fujinon XF 18 – 55 mm , cheap (7,50 €) Neewer IR filter, 720 nm

  7. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Wosven in A few infrareds   
    Some willows in Haldern, Germany, taken a month ago.
    Fujifilm X-T20 + Fujinon XF 18 – 55 mm , cheap (7,50 €) Neewer IR filter, 720 nm

  8. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from BiffBrown in Astrophotography - ideas, suggestions, hints collection   
    Oops! Didn't even notice this thread got replies. At least till now.
    Thank you for your hints - but unfortunately it does not help.
    firstdefence: The Dehaze tool does not remove a gradient.
    Lee D: This is indeed a real helpful video (as most works of James "the voice" Ritson) are, but also does not deal with gradients. I also liked his amazing video about pin sharp stars.
    John: I did, several times before opening this thread. By the way: You really should try astrophotography; it's one of that hobbies which really conjure a big fat smile on your face. Which sometimes even replaces the memories of the previous hours when you pondered about shattering all your equipment into pieces.
    I also wrote a little poem about that hours in the dark. Unfortunately, it's very German, so I fear you cannot really enjoy it. But you never know ...
    Doch manchmal am Abend vergess ich die Welt,
    erhebe die Augen zum himmlischen Zelt,
    schau Sterne, den Mond, die Planeten, das Licht,
    in weiteste Fernen reicht dann meine Sicht.
    Nah wie der Tisch scheint die funkelnde Pracht,
    undenklich fern in unendlicher Nacht.
    Ich schaue so weit, ich schaue das Sein,
    das All und die Schöpfung und fühle mich klein.
    Ganz klein im Anblick der Unendlichkeit,
    ganz klein im endlosen Raum und der Zeit,
    ganz klein unter dem, was die Schöpfung erfüllt,
    ganz groß, weil es sich meinem Auge enthüllt.
    Erm ... Back to topic.
    I guess I should explain the term "gradient" in the light of astrophotography a bit.
    Gradients are discolorations and brightness variations (similar to vignetting) often caused by light pollution (usually giving them an ugly yellowish color) and the special characteristics of the telescope/additional lenses/camera combination, often caused or increased by irregular sensor illumination.
    There are means ("flat frames") for reducing that "picture pollution", but these sometimes are just impractical. Thus a software-based solution often is the key.
    I'll show you the ugly face of a gradient.

    First picture (lunatic settings for highlighting the problem) clearly shows the culprit.

    Second picture appears to be a bit better. (That picture got just about 14 minutes of exposition, thus the quality is still very low.)
    That gradient seems to be almost gone - but at the same time the fainter stars and masses of details also waved farewell.
    Just note the nebular object in the upper left, the "running man" nebula. Almost gone; and not really for good.

  9. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from segts in A few infrareds   
    The "Battenbergturm", one and only landmark of Haldern, Germany, taken about a month ago.
    Fujifilm X-T20 + Fujinon XF 18 – 55 mm , cheap (7,50 €) Neewer IR filter, 720 nm

  10. Thanks
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Chris B in [Fixed] Beta crashes if not finishing adding a new Live Filter Layer and switching tabs   
    Open a picture. Open another picture. Start adding a New Live Filter Layer, but don't close the dialog. Switch to the other picture by clicking it's tab. Switch back to the second picture. Game over.  
    Video:
     
  11. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from SrPx in Global key definitions/mouse wheel for changing brush size   
    Please allow quoting myself: "But the wheel spin alternative would be an addition, no replacement."
    And of course I second SrPx: Zooming with the wheel is the most intuitive and best way.
    This has nothing to do with habits of "old dogs".
    If cars feature a steering wheel, that's not because old dogs are used to it. It's because it's the best solution.
    If shoes are the way to go, it's not because old dogs just like walking in their shoes. It's because shoes are a proven means.
    Like the mouse wheel for zooming/changing sizes.
    Add some "innovation" by utilizing the spin speed for achieving coarse and precise changes, see happiness in the faces of old dogs and puppies alike.
    End of barking.
  12. Thanks
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from haakoo in Global key definitions/mouse wheel for changing brush size   
    Please allow quoting myself: "But the wheel spin alternative would be an addition, no replacement."
    And of course I second SrPx: Zooming with the wheel is the most intuitive and best way.
    This has nothing to do with habits of "old dogs".
    If cars feature a steering wheel, that's not because old dogs are used to it. It's because it's the best solution.
    If shoes are the way to go, it's not because old dogs just like walking in their shoes. It's because shoes are a proven means.
    Like the mouse wheel for zooming/changing sizes.
    Add some "innovation" by utilizing the spin speed for achieving coarse and precise changes, see happiness in the faces of old dogs and puppies alike.
    End of barking.
  13. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Mark Ingram in [Fixed] Beta crashes if not finishing adding a new Live Filter Layer and switching tabs   
    @Mark Ingram - Indeed, stupid me !
    Thank you for moving it to the right place.
  14. Thanks
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to Mark Ingram in [Fixed] Beta crashes if not finishing adding a new Live Filter Layer and switching tabs   
    Hi Jorn, you've posted this into the non-beta forum. I'll move it over to the beta forum.
  15. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from IPv6 in Global key definitions/mouse wheel for changing brush size   
    Ahh, sorry, I don't like that idea too much.
    Reason is severe interruption of the workflow, a major hindrance.
    Example ...
    Let's take a typical masking workflow, as usual you wish to isolate the sky in a picture, trees in the background.
    You grab the masking brush, easily mask the coarse elements, but then the fine work starts - like masking the space between twigs where the sky should shine through.
    In that situation, you constantly need to change the size of the masking brush, adapt it to the size and other properties of the area to mask, also need to quickly switch between Snap to edges and regular behavior. And you like to do that without interrupting your workflow, without moving the brush away.
    You constantly need to compare the brush size with the area to mask, you need to see the proportions, thus you always need to see the picture and the brush. And you need to see the brush exactly at the place where you wish to use it.
    Easy to accomplish if you use keyboard keys (if it's not "[" "]" with non-English keyboards) or mousewheel.
    But *impossible* to do if you need to go though a complex selection dialog with every single change of the brush size. Might take hours, you cannot compare the proportions of brush and area to mask, position of your brush also changes.
    A sound configuration might be:
    Mousewheel always changes the brush size if a brush is selected and the pointer is hovering over a picture. Fast spin: Quick and coarse size change. Slow spin: Pixel-wise size change. Configurable modifier keys, like Alt for changing the hardness or Shift for changing opacity and the like. Or Q, W, E for Opacity, Flow, Hardness - up to your taste. Mouse wheel button controls switches like Snap to edges, doubleclick for wet edges, keeping pressed for using a third switch etc., also configurable according to the features you need most. Just imagine that way - would feel just natural. Like changing the zoom using CTRL + mouse wheel. An intuitive no-brainer.

    (Yes, I am fighting for that idea. )
  16. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to SrPx in Global key definitions/mouse wheel for changing brush size   
    I'm fine with that, pretty much. Using the wheel with any key modifier. I wouldn't oppose. For all I have gathered, a lot of us use (in many apps) mouse wheel for zoom (and ckickable wheel button, MMB, for panning), so, really uncool to replace that for brush size change function. Now, alt + wheel for brush size, fine with me.  Anyway, I'd really see bad if these are added as the only option, instead of an optional (default or not) check. As am pretty fine with AP and AD as they are now, regarding pan/zoom and brush size changing options.
  17. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to Sahil Ansari in Black and white to Color gradient effect in Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo   
    In this video, We are going to show you, How to create Black and white to Color gradient effect in Affinity, This method works in both software (Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo).
     
  18. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to Sahil Ansari in How to quickly remove the complex background | Affinity Photo   
    How to remove or change the background in Affinity Photo with refine the selection. 
     
  19. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to ianrb in recent affinity photo edits   
    some recent images that travelled through Affinity Photo -- old fashion dodge and burn would the most used tool used in these images 
    Lumix Fz300 
    Just like a big kid : throw -- throw it ----- ------ ----- ----- not so far next time

    Lonely pelican 


    three photos of the one tree >background is bark from a nearby tree + a little texture brushing 

    as above plus : black and white adjustment layer with a multiply blending layer + the orton effect
     
    I saw something in this long dead tree root beside the river ; however what I saw was not quite like how it ended up 
    Very similar edits as the above files > 


    honest comments / suggestions for next time / questions welcome 
  20. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to Jeni in Trees,( painting)   
    Hello, 
    I have tryed brushes, blanding modes an effects on paper surfaces. I think it is interesting to work free in Affinity.
    This one it is done in AffinityPhoto.

  21. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from MrDoodlezz in A few infrareds   
    Yes, this is infrared. I'll attach a small version of the original photo right out of camera.
    I found it highly interesting as I realized all that intense colors were still in the photo.
    Fujifilm X-T20 + Fujinon XF 18 – 55 mm , cheap (7,50 €) Neewer IR filter, 720 nm
     


  22. Thanks
    Jörn Reppenhagen got a reaction from Chris B in Crash when using QuickMask   
    1. Fire up the beta.
    2. Open any stored picture file.
    3. Click on QuickMask in the upper toolbar.
    4. Choose the Donut tool in the toolbar on the left.
    5. Try to draw a donut in the picture.
    Exitus.
    Video:
     
  23. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to Rick G in Issue with Paint Brush Opacity   
    I tried to paint out some lettering this morning. The Opacity and Flow were at 100% yet the paint went on as if the opacity was set very low. I reset the brush although I had never changed any of it's settings (just to be thorough)
    I'm either missing something and this is user error or we have a bug
    Scteencast attached
     
    Photo Paint Flow.ENCODING.mp4
  24. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to Sahil Ansari in How to create fruit juice manipulation in Affinity Photo   
    Here is available Affinity Photo tutorial for creating a fruit juice manipulation. In this tutorial, we will see how to create orange cane juice portrait manipulation image.
     
  25. Like
    Jörn Reppenhagen reacted to R C-R in Where are 'Levels'?   
    The output of the development process is a document in the 'native' Affinity format -- if you save it, it will have an .afphoto file type extension.
    This is not the same as the jpg, tif, png, or any other image file format. It is a proprietary format that only the Affinity apps can open. It can optionally save things like the editing history or snapshots or a document palette, plus a few other things like mipmaps that only Affinity apps can use.
    An unusual feature of the native file format is that documents created in Affinity Designer will have an .afdesign extension but it is identical to the .afphoto file format (the extension just determines which app will open the file by default if both are installed), which means either app can open native format files created in the other one without loss or conversion.
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